Title

The use of selected readings of early childhood literature: Implications for influencing the sharing behavior of preschool children with special needs in the integrated classroom

Date of Completion

January 2003

Keywords

Education, Early Childhood|Education, Special|Education, Curriculum and Instruction

Degree

Ph.D.

Abstract

This exploratory study investigated the influence of prescribed presentations of selected readings of early childhood literature on the sharing behavior of preschool children who have individualized education programs (I.E.P.s) with goals and objectives related to social skill development. Previous research indicates that the presentation of selected readings of early childhood literature positively effects the sharing behavior of typically developing young children in the classroom (Bhavnagri & Samuels, 1996; Black, Seeman, & Trobaugh, 1999; Krogh & Lamme, 1985; Shepherd & Koberstein, 1989; Trepanier & Romatowski, 1982). This method has not been investigated as a way to promote sharing behavior of preschool children with I.E.P.s containing goals and objectives related to social skill development. ^ An instructional sequence of story readings, class discussions, and subsequent activities was presented to an integrated preschool class of twelve students over a three-week period. Frequency data obtained from five videotaped observations of free play occurring after the story readings and activities was analyzed to determine differences between pretest and posttest observations of the entire class and groups of students (i.e., students with I.E.P.s and students without I.E.P.s). A significant difference between and posttest scores for the entire class of students was determined by a paired samples t-test and one-way ANOVA. No significant differences were found between groups of students suggesting the groups of students were affected similarly by the intervention. ^ Coded data from videotaped observations was used to determine which types of sharing behavior (i.e., cooperate, exchange, give, and offer) were most frequent for the students. Cooperate behaviors were the most common sharing behaviors demonstrated by the entire class and by groups of students. ^ Coded data was also used to determine the influence of a particular classroom setting in relation to the frequency of sharing behavior. The classroom setting where the most sharing behaviors occurred was in the kitchen area. ^ Trends in the sharing behaviors of the students in the classroom were also examined. Based on the results of the study it appears that children with identified social skill delays benefited from the intervention in ways similar to their normally developing peers. ^