Title

A STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TEACHER LOYALTY AND THE PERCEIVED LEADERSHIP STYLE OF THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPAL

Date of Completion

January 1982

Keywords

Education, Administration

Degree

Ph.D.

Abstract

The Problem. Leadership has been a research topic for 50 years. Presently, the emphasis is on the leader's behavior and its effects upon the members of his/her organization.^ One topic which emerged from this perspective was that of subordinate loyalty to the immediate superior, and that also served as the impetus to investigate the relationship between leadership style and loyalty. Fourteen independent variables were analyzed to determine their relationship to loyalty.^ Procedure. Fourteen of 38 communities agreed to participate in this study. Twenty-eight principals and 144 teachers were participants.^ Leadership style was identified by the leader Behavior Description Questionnaire. Subordinate loyalty was measured by the Hoy Scale; while the personal and role-related variables were assessed by scales developed by Hrebiniak and Alutto.^ Three hypotheses were developed to examine the relationships between the variables. Analyses of variance and regression analysis were used to examine these relationships. Hypotheses were rejected at the .05 level.^ Conclusions. (1) There was a significant relationship (p < .001) between the Integrated Style of leadership and loyalty. (2) There was a significant relationship (p < .05) between age and interpersonal trust and loyalty. (3) The interaction effects between interpersonal trust and intent to seek advanced degrees; interpersonal trust and religious affiliation; authoritarianism and formal education; and authoritarianism and intent to seek advanced degrees were significantly related (p < .05) to loyalty. (4) There was a significant relationship between role tension (p < .001), the number of years of teaching experience (p < .05), organizational commitment (p < .001) and loyalty. (5) The interaction effects between dissatisfaction and organizational commitment were significantly related (p < .01) to loyalty.^ Recommendations. The following topics were suggested for further research: (1) Would the conclusions of this study be similar if regression analysis was used with a larger sample? (2) Is there a significant relationship between years of teaching experience and loyalty or was significance achieved by chance? (3) Is there a relationship between leadership style and pupils' academic achievement? (4) What other variables may be significantly related to loyalty? (5) What other aspects of organizational life may be significantly related to loyalty? ^