Title

THE INTERACTION OF ORGANIZATION TYPE, LOCUS OF CONTROL OF MOTIVATION AND ROLE CONFLICT ON THE JOB SATISFACTION AND JOB STRESS OF SELECTED MIDDLE MANAGERS

Date of Completion

January 1985

Keywords

Education, Administration

Degree

Ph.D.

Abstract

This study examined the interaction of organization type, locus of control of motivation and role conflict with job satisfaction and job stress of middle managers within three different organizations. It sought to isolate differences within these managers in job satisfaction and job stress.^ Several hypotheses were generated from the major hypothesis of no significant differences among the managers in the three organizations at any level of interaction of agency, locus of control and/or role conflict as evidenced by job satisfaction and/or job stress. These hypotheses were tested and the results reported, using the techniques outlined below.^ Three organizations were identified to represent business, professional and volunteer middle managers. The middle management levels within all three organizations were identified and sampled with the developed instrumentation. The instrumentation included demographic data, instruments to measure job satisfaction (and its sub-parts) and job stress, and instruments to measure and classify organization type, locus of control of motivation and role conflict.^ Three-way analysis of variance was used to test several hypotheses, accepting all such hypotheses at the .01 level of significance, except those hypotheses dealing with job satisfaction and job stress analyzed by organization type which showed "volunteers" to be most satisfied and least stressful, "professionals" to be mid-satisfied and mid-stressful, and "business personnel" to be least satisfied and most stressful.^ Using Rao's V, discriminant analysis determined which variables generated the most discriminating power toward classification-by-group, with the prediction being very accurate when considering only organization type and losing accuracy as sub-groups are created. Thus, all hypotheses associated with discriminant analysis were rejected at the .01 level of significance indicating that group-classification by selected variables can be accomplished.^ Relationships of all pairs of variables were done using appropriate parametric or non-parametric coefficients. While the hypothesis of no relationship was rejected at the .01 level of significance, these separate correlations were not of research importance.^ The results indicate that middle managers within three organizations differ in their job satisfaction and their job stress. Volunteers are more satisfied and less stressed, with professionals next and business personnel least satisfied and most stressed. ^