Title

Instructional management behavior, time management, and selected background variables of elementary school principals in Connecticut's urban school districts

Date of Completion

January 1993

Keywords

Education, Administration

Degree

Ph.D.

Abstract

This study examines the relationship among instructional management behavior, time management, years of administrative experience, school size, and gender of elementary school principals in Connecticut's urban school districts. A quantitative research methodology was used to measure the instructional leadership behavior and time management skills of elementary school principals in Connecticut's five large urban school districts.^ Data regarding elementary school principals' perceptions of instructional leadership were collected using the Principal Instructional Management Rating Scale (PIMRS). The Executive Time Management Instrument (ETMI) was the instrument used to collect data on how elementary principals use time effectively. Respondents also completed a brief data sheet to obtain information concerning years of administrative experience, school size, and gender. All surveys were self-administered. Data collection resulted in an 81% response rate.^ Eight null hypotheses were tested to examine relationships and differences between the dependent variable (perceived instructional management behavior) and the independent variables (time management, years of administrative experience, school size, and gender). Analysis of variance (ANOVA), Pearson Product-Moment correlation, and hierarchical regression analysis were the statistical procedures used to analyze the data. The.05 level of significance was used in all statistical procedures.^ The findings of this study indicate that: (1) there was a significant relationship between perceived instructional management behavior and time management skills of elementary school principals; (2) there was a significant difference between males and females on time management in the areas of staff supervision and work environment, and (3) time management is a significant predictor of one's instructional management behavior after controlling for differences due to years of administrative experience, school size, and gender.^ The fact that a significant relationship was established between instructional management behavior and time management suggests that those who practice effective instructional management behavior also make effective use of time management techniques. The implication for training principals to be instructional leaders should also include programs that focus on the teaching of time management skills and practices. Recommendations for future research were specified. ^