Title

Non-use, disadoption, adoption and long-term use of family planning behaviors: The case of the 1993 Philippine National Communication Campaign on Family Planning

Date of Completion

January 1999

Keywords

Psychology, Social|Health Sciences, Public Health|Mass Communications

Degree

Ph.D.

Abstract

The disadoption processes of three categories of contraceptive methods—all methods, modern methods and traditional methods—were using components of the Theory of Action Identification (Vallacher & Wegner, 1985) and Diffusion of Innovation models (Rogers, 1995). When demographic and socio-economic factors are controlled for, disadoption will be discouraged by more knowledge about a method, inconsistency between the attitude toward family planning and toward a method, the perceived social acceptability of contraceptives, more campaign exposure and access to health services. More contraceptive choices will lead to replacement disadoption; less choices to permanent disadoption. Time and its impact on predictor variables will decrease the risks of permanent and replacement disadoption; and of non-users remaining non-users. A three-wave panel (n = 2,396) survey conducted to evaluate the 1993 Philippine National Communication Campaign on Family Planning was analyzed using multinomial logistic regression and Event History Analysis. ^ About a tenth of the respondents practiced family planning throughout the survey period by switching methods (replacement disadoption). Sixteen percent, at least within the study's time frame, were permanent disadopters. The odds of disadopting all methods (permanent disadoption) decreased relative to long-term use by an additional year in the age of the respondent and an additional young child; and one campaign source recalled and visit to a health center. The odds of disadoption of modern methods (usually replacement disadoption) decreased relative to long-term use by an additional visit to a health center, one unit decrease in attitude inconsistency, and an addition to the set of acceptable methods. The odds of disadopting traditional methods relative to long-term use decreased with an additional item of knowledge of traditional methods recalled and an additional year in the age of the respondent; but increased with one addition to the set of acceptable methods. Findings from longitudinal analyses showed that family planning practitioners were more likely to disadopt in the second transitional phase than in the first. The study was a demonstration of two formative research procedures for developing communication strategies for specific market segments and evaluating over time when these strategies are effective. ^