Title

Moderating effects of intelligence stereotypes on attributions and resulting perceptions of ability in the presence and absence of affirmative action

Date of Completion

January 2000

Keywords

Psychology, Social

Degree

Ph.D.

Abstract

The impact of intelligence stereotypes on attributions for the admission or rejection of minority and majority applicants in the presence or absence of an affirmative action policy was investigated. Resulting perceptions of applicant intellectual ability were also investigated. Three hundred seventy-four high school seniors from two locations (New Jersey and California) participated in the study. Participants viewed two college applications from White, African American, Asian American, or Hispanic American ethnic backgrounds. Participants made ratings of the intelligence of the applicants, then were given information about the presence or absence of an affirmative action policy. Participants made ratings of the policy, then learned that each applicant was either accepted or rejected. Participants made open-ended and scaled attributions for the acceptance and rejection of the applicants, then again made ratings of the intelligence of the applicants. A three-stage model was hypothesized and tested using Structural Equations Modeling. Support for the overall model was not evidenced, however support for individual stages of the model was obtained. ^