Date of Completion

5-6-2017

Embargo Period

4-19-2020

Advisors

Jennifer Mozeiko, Ph.D.; Carl Coelho, Ph.D.; Tammie Spaulding, Ph.D

Field of Study

Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences

Degree

Master of Arts

Open Access

Open Access

Abstract

Background: Schuell’s Stimulation Approach is frequently implemented within conventional speech language therapy (SLT) for aphasia. Recent research supports the use of intensive treatment, as well as the potential for continued gains in the chronic stage of aphasia. Given the limited evidence-based treatment options for individuals with chronic, severe non-fluent aphasia, investigation was warranted.

Aims: The current study used a single subject design with multiple probes across behaviors to investigate how an individual with chronic, severe non-fluent aphasia, who had ceased to make gains in conventional SLT, would respond to administration of Schuell’s Stimulation Approach at the standard intensive dosage of 30 hours over 2 weeks, whether gains would be generalized to untrained stimuli, and whether gains would be maintained overall.

Methods & Procedures: A participant with chronic, severe non-fluent aphasia participated in daily therapy (3 hours/day for 10 days) targeting naming and auditory comprehension. Daily probes were administered for trained and untrained naming and auditory comprehension stimuli, as well as discourse. Standardized assessments, naming and auditory comprehension probes, and discourse measures were taken pre- and post- treatment and also 5 and 10-weeks after the completion of treatment.

Outcomes & Results: The participant showed clinically significant changes on standardized assessments, naming and auditory comprehension probes, with maintenance of gains in nearly all cases. Clinically significant changes were also found for untrained auditory comprehension stimuli indicating generalization.

Conclusions: Schuell’s Stimulation Approach administered in an intensive dosage resulted in positive changes in aphasia severity for an individual with chronic, severe non-fluent aphasia who had ceased to make gains in conventional SLT. This study adds evidence for the role of increased intensity for participants who present similarly to realize additional receptive and expressive language improvements.

Major Advisor

Jennifer Mozeiko, Ph.D.

Available for download on Sunday, April 19, 2020

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