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Abstract

Abstract

This exploratory study sought to understand the challenges of navigating the health care system from the perspectives of post-incarcerated individuals; and, to develop dissemination strategies to support these individuals in their efforts to provide self-care management following incarceration. Phase 2 provided a pilot test of the effectiveness of an informational CD and flyer intervention and the outcome of self-care. Sixty-two individuals with an incarceration history participated in this pretest-posttest with a 1-month follow up study. A significant change in knowledge and utilization of services (χ2 =12.571, df =1, p =.001) was found immediately after the intervention; and was maintained at the 1-month measure (χ2 = 5.12, p < 0.024); with men reporting greater difficulty navigating the healthcare system post-incarceration (χ2=7.272, df =1, p =.016). Participants who had received materials expressed a greater interest in learning about: medications, side effects, and drug interactions (χ2 = 5.024, df=1, p < 0.027), health insurance (χ2 = 9.953, df=1, p < .002), crisis hotlines (χ2 = 7.488, df=1, p < .007), and health clinics (χ2=11.063, df =1, p < 0.001). Based upon Phase 1 qualitative findings, further exploration of these variables reveal that participants who were interested in learning about health insurance (pretest) improved in knowledge specifically regarding medications, side effects, and drug interactions at posttest22=5.720, df=1, p=.017). Those who were interested in learning about community health clinics (pretest) were most interested in transportation (χ2 =8.619, df =1,

p =.003) and reproductive health information (χ2 =4.350, df=1, p=.037) at posttest2. This information is needed by participants who now transitioning to community systems of care, could go to the community clinic and not be fearful of losing their bed in the DOC managed halfway house.

Keywords: healthcare; post-incarceration; dissemination; barriers; recidivism

Funding

Funding provided by Connecticut Institute for Clinical and Translational Science

University of Connecticut Health Center

UCONN IRB #H14-103

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