•  
  •  
 

Abstract

Abstract

An innovative communication training technique, ‘Rapid Fire’, was created to enhance communication and was incorporated into the debrief component of a simulation designed for correctional nurses to promote learning and engagement. The term ‘Rapid Fire’ was used to expose the critical time element that appears in the first five minutes of many crisis situations, where a quick relay of information and problem solving is essential; such as in a cardiac arrest or other rapidly deteriorating patient situations. This technique consists of a five-minute session prior to the structured debrief. During the ‘Rapid Fire’ portion of the debrief, all learners are together discussing the elements of the simulation and are permitted to dialog. They are encouraged to talk to one another, as the facilitator is not permitted to mediate during the five-minute period. The educator is actively listening to the team discussion.

A sample of eighteen educators participated. The mean age of the participants was 43.2 years (range: 33-57) with an average of being employed approximately 3 years (range: 0-9) in their role as a correctional nurse educator. The average years as a simulation based educator was approximately 2.4 years. The majority of participants were female (89%). Responses to the 3-item open-ended survey were positive. Responses indicated that participants were engaged, civil and felt supported. One negative response indicated that more training was needed with real patients.

It was concluded that learners were allowed to self-correct anything that was done or omitted during the stress of the simulation. Participation in this technique reinforced team collaboration that occurs in the clinical setting.

authorship_form.docx (15 kB)
authorship_form.docx